UCSD TowerJazz 256 element array chipMassive MIMO for extraordinary speed. 256 60 GHz antennas and their control logic fit on a 4-centimeter square "wafer-scale phased array transmitter" prototype from TowerJazz Semi, working with UCSD and DARPA. It should easily deliver 10 gigabit wireless, at least over short distances.

Ted Rappaport and others are proving high frequency millimeter waves can work.

Ted and Bob Heath are editors of Millimeter Wave Wireless Communications, the standard textbook. At those frequencies, there's massive amount of unused spectrum. Millimeter wave antennas are small enough for many to fit on a chip, enabling Massive MIMO. At 100 meters in the right environment, 10 gig can be easily surpassed.

Massive phased array antennas have been used by the military for many years. They are too expensive for anyone except governments and can spread over acres. The TowerJazz wafer is built on a state of the art 0.18-micron SiGe bipolar process. The market is modest for the next few years.  

Gabriel Rebeiz of University of California San Diego led the research. The chip was designed and tested by Samet Zihir and Ozan Gurbuz with funding from DARPA. Rebeiz is willing to offer chip samples to other researchers. TowerJazz is set up to efficiently do small runs for DOD and NASA and can produce as needed.

Henry Samueli says this technology is close and I believe Broadcom is well along developing their own chip. 

 

TowerJazz and UCSD Demonstrate First 5G 256-Element 60 GHz Silicon Wafer-Scale Phased Array Transmitter


Targets the >$500M emerging market of 5G 60 GHz base stations with beamforming capabilities

Enables lower cost phased arrays for commercial and aerospace & defense markets through integration of multiple circuit functions and high efficiency antennas on the same silicon chip

 


NEWPORT BEACH and SAN DIEGO, Calif., May 14, 2015  TowerJazz, the global specialty foundry leader, and The University of California, San Diego (UCSD), a recognized leader for microwave, millimeter-wave and mixed-signal RFICs, today announced they have collaborated to demonstrate the first 256-element (16 x 16) wafer-scale phased array transmitter with integrated high-efficiency antennas operating at 56-65 GHz frequency range.  First time success was achieved for the wafer-scale RFIC using TowerJazz’s own proprietary models, kit and the mmWave capabilities of its 0.18-micron SiGe BiCMOS process, SBC18H3. 

In addition, TowerJazz proprietary methods allowed for very large chip area with an extremely high level of integration.  The phased-array system-on-a-chip (SoC) targets the emerging 5G high-performance wireless standard which will aim for greater than 10 Gbps (gigabits per second) peak data-rate communication.  The array has beamforming capabilities that include independent amplitude and phase control for all 256 different antenna elements.  By developing this wafer-scale chip, UCSD and TowerJazz have successfully demonstrated highly scalable RF-IC transmitters for 5G phased array applications.  The collaboration of the wafer-scale phased array chip was partially funded through collaboration with DARPA.

Phased arrays allow the electronic steering of an antenna beam in any direction and with high antenna gain by controlling the phase at each antenna element. The radiation beam can be “moved in space” using entirely electronic means through control of the phase and amplitude at each antenna element used to generate the beam. This beam steering technique is much more compact and much faster than mechanically steered arrays. Furthermore, phased arrays allow the creation of deep nulls in the radiation pattern to mitigate strong interference signals from several different directions. They have been in use since the 1950s in defense applications and have seen limited use in commercial systems due to their relatively high cost. UCSD’s design and utilization of TowerJazz wafer processes are targeted to greatly reduce the cost of phased arrays especially at millimeter-wave frequencies for 5G communication systems. 

“This is yet another leap forward in the area of phased arrays that we are proud to announce. We have a track record of successful collaboration with TowerJazz and the ability to bring this innovative design from UCSD to market depends strongly on TowerJazz’s SiGe BiCMOS foundry process which enables lower-cost phased arrays through integration of multiple circuit functions and high efficiency antennas on the same silicon chip,” said Dr. Gabriel M. Rebeiz, Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering at UCSD, the lead professor on this chip. 

"We believe the results achieved by UCSD’s 5G 60 GHz phased array transmitter again demonstrate the remarkable teamwork between TowerJazz, UCSD and DARPA, to provide novel capabilities and technologies to both the aerospace and defense community as well as commercial markets,” said Dr. David Howard, TowerJazz’s Executive Director and Fellow & Co-PI for the DAHI Program. “It is satisfying to have our long term collaboration and vision bear fruit, as shown in this demonstration, and to bring attention to our enabling role in emerging 5G markets and standards.” 

About UCSD’s Phased Array SoC
The wafer-scale 256-element SiGe BiCMOS SoC phased-array is 42x42 mm2 and combines the 60 GHz source, amplifiers, distribution network, phase shifters, voltage controlled amplifiers, and high-efficiency on-chip antennas (16 x 16 elements), allowing record performance for a new generation of high-performance phased arrays for the 60 GHz band (56-65 GHz). Such an advancement better serves the needs of the greater than $500M emerging market of 5G 60 GHz base-stations with beamforming capabilities and Gbps data rates. The antennas are integrated on-chip which removes the expensive and lossy transitions and distribution network between the phased array and the off-chip antennas.

This wafer-scale phased array with 256 radiating elements, together with all the necessary CMOS control circuits such as dual SPI control (serial parallel interface), is capable of electronic beam scanning to +/-50 degrees in all planes – the most of any mm-wave phased-array antenna to date. A measured EIRP (equivalent isotropically radiated power) of 45 dBm at 60 GHz was achieved from the wafer-scale array at an operating temperature of 95-100oC, congruent with base-station temperatures, and within the FCC’s EIRP power limits for 60 GHz band. The architecture could be scaled to 512 (16x32) or 1024 (32x32) elements due to on-chip antenna integration and the wafer-scale integration of multiple reticles on a single chip.  

About TowerJazz’s SBC18H3 BiCMOS Process
The phased array chip was developed using TowerJazz’s SBC18H3 BiCMOS which offers both high-performance 0.18-micron SiGe bipolar and high quality passive elements combined with high density 0.18-micron CMOS, to enable high-speed networking and millimeter wave applications. The process offers SiGe transistors with peak Fmax of 280 GHz and peak Ft of 240 GHz, ideal for low-power, high performance millimeter wave circuits, which replace the need for more expensive GaAs chips. SBC18H3 comes standard with 1.8 and 3.3 volt CMOS (dual-gate), deep trench isolation, lateral and vertical PNP transistors, MIM capacitors, high-performance varactors, poly-silicon as well as metal and N-well resistors, p-i-n and Schottky diodes, high-Q inductors,  triple well isolation, and six layers of metal.  TowerJazz also manufactures a faster, lower noise process, named SBC18H4, with Fmax of 340 GHz.
  
The chip was designed and tested by Samet Zihir and Ozan Gurbuz from the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at UCSD under the supervision of Prof. Gabriel M. Rebeiz, with help from Dr. Arjun Karroy, TowerJazz, and was sponsored by the DARPA DAHI program under the direction of Dr. Daniel Green. 

Availability
The SBC18H3 process is available through the TowerJazz multi-project wafer (MPW) systemwww.towerjazz.com. The chip is available from UCSD and interested parties should contact Prof. Gabriel M. Rebeiz; Department of Electrical and Computing Engineering at UCSD, 858/534-8001 orThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

TowerJazz will be exhibiting at IMS 2015 (booth #736) on May 19-21, and Dr. Rebeiz from UCSD will be presenting a paper on May 20, titled, “A 60 GHz 64-element Wafer-Scale Phased-Array with Full-Reticle Design” in Room 125AB from 1:50pm – 2:10pm.

About UCSD
The University of California, San Diego, is one of the leading Universities in mixed-signal, microwave and mm-wave RFICs, digital communications, applied electromagnetics, RF MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) and nano-electronics research, and is home to the Center for Wireless Communications.  UCSD has an annual research budget exceeding $850M, and its Jacobs School of Engineering is ranked as Number 17 in the US-News and World Report 2015 ranking.  The Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, consisting of 46 teaching tenure faculty, trains approximately 400 graduate students per year. For more information, please visit www.ece.ucsd.edu and www.ucsd.edu.  

About TowerJazz
Tower Semiconductor Ltd. (NASDAQ: TSEM, TASE: TSEM) and its fully owned U.S. subsidiary Jazz Semiconductor, Inc. operate collectively under the brand name TowerJazz, the global specialty foundry leader. TowerJazz manufactures integrated circuits, offering a broad range of customizable process technologies including: SiGe, BiCMOS, mixed-signal/CMOS, RF CMOS, CMOS image sensor, integrated power management (BCD and 700V), and MEMS. TowerJazz also provides a world-class design enablement platform for a quick and accurate design cycle as well as Transfer Optimization and development Process Services (TOPS) to IDMs and fabless companies that need to expand capacity.

To provide multi-fab sourcing and extended capacity for its customers, TowerJazz operates two manufacturing facilities in Israel (150mm and 200mm), one in the U.S. (200mm) and three additional facilities in Japan (two 200mm and one 300mm) through TowerJazz Panasonic Semiconductor Co. (TPSCo), established with Panasonic Corporation of which TowerJazz has the majority holding. Through TPSCo, TowerJazz provides leading edge 45nm CMOS, 65nm RF CMOS and 65nm 1.12um pixel technologies, including the most advanced image sensor technologies. For more information, please visit www.towerjazz.com and www.tpsemico.com.256

 

TowerJazz and UCSD Demonstrate First 5G 256-Element 60 GHz Silicon Wafer-Scale Phased Array Transmitter

41.6 mm - 256-Element Array Chip

Targets the >$500M emerging market of 5G 60 GHz base stations with beamforming capabilities

 

Enables lower cost phased arrays for commercial and aerospace & defense markets through integration of multiple circuit functions and high efficiency antennas on the same silicon chip

 


NEWPORT BEACH and SAN DIEGO, Calif., May 14, 2015  TowerJazz, the global specialty foundry leader, and The University of California, San Diego (UCSD), a recognized leader for microwave, millimeter-wave and mixed-signal RFICs, today announced they have collaborated to demonstrate the first 256-element (16 x 16) wafer-scale phased array transmitter with integrated high-efficiency antennas operating at 56-65 GHz frequency range.  First time success was achieved for the wafer-scale RFIC using TowerJazz’s own proprietary models, kit and the mmWave capabilities of its 0.18-micron SiGe BiCMOS process, SBC18H3. 

In addition, TowerJazz proprietary methods allowed for very large chip area with an extremely high level of integration.  The phased-array system-on-a-chip (SoC) targets the emerging 5G high-performance wireless standard which will aim for greater than 10 Gbps (gigabits per second) peak data-rate communication.  The array has beamforming capabilities that include independent amplitude and phase control for all 256 different antenna elements.  By developing this wafer-scale chip, UCSD and TowerJazz have successfully demonstrated highly scalable RF-IC transmitters for 5G phased array applications.  The collaboration of the wafer-scale phased array chip was partially funded through collaboration with DARPA.

Phased arrays allow the electronic steering of an antenna beam in any direction and with high antenna gain by controlling the phase at each antenna element. The radiation beam can be “moved in space” using entirely electronic means through control of the phase and amplitude at each antenna element used to generate the beam. This beam steering technique is much more compact and much faster than mechanically steered arrays. Furthermore, phased arrays allow the creation of deep nulls in the radiation pattern to mitigate strong interference signals from several different directions. They have been in use since the 1950s in defense applications and have seen limited use in commercial systems due to their relatively high cost. UCSD’s design and utilization of TowerJazz wafer processes are targeted to greatly reduce the cost of phased arrays especially at millimeter-wave frequencies for 5G communication systems. 

“This is yet another leap forward in the area of phased arrays that we are proud to announce. We have a track record of successful collaboration with TowerJazz and the ability to bring this innovative design from UCSD to market depends strongly on TowerJazz’s SiGe BiCMOS foundry process which enables lower-cost phased arrays through integration of multiple circuit functions and high efficiency antennas on the same silicon chip,” said Dr. Gabriel M. Rebeiz, Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering at UCSD, the lead professor on this chip. 

"We believe the results achieved by UCSD’s 5G 60 GHz phased array transmitter again demonstrate the remarkable teamwork between TowerJazz, UCSD and DARPA, to provide novel capabilities and technologies to both the aerospace and defense community as well as commercial markets,” said Dr. David Howard, TowerJazz’s Executive Director and Fellow & Co-PI for the DAHI Program. “It is satisfying to have our long term collaboration and vision bear fruit, as shown in this demonstration, and to bring attention to our enabling role in emerging 5G markets and standards.” 

About UCSD’s Phased Array SoC
The wafer-scale 256-element SiGe BiCMOS SoC phased-array is 42x42 mm2 and combines the 60 GHz source, amplifiers, distribution network, phase shifters, voltage controlled amplifiers, and high-efficiency on-chip antennas (16 x 16 elements), allowing record performance for a new generation of high-performance phased arrays for the 60 GHz band (56-65 GHz). Such an advancement better serves the needs of the greater than $500M emerging market of 5G 60 GHz base-stations with beamforming capabilities and Gbps data rates. The antennas are integrated on-chip which removes the expensive and lossy transitions and distribution network between the phased array and the off-chip antennas.

This wafer-scale phased array with 256 radiating elements, together with all the necessary CMOS control circuits such as dual SPI control (serial parallel interface), is capable of electronic beam scanning to +/-50 degrees in all planes – the most of any mm-wave phased-array antenna to date. A measured EIRP (equivalent isotropically radiated power) of 45 dBm at 60 GHz was achieved from the wafer-scale array at an operating temperature of 95-100oC, congruent with base-station temperatures, and within the FCC’s EIRP power limits for 60 GHz band. The architecture could be scaled to 512 (16x32) or 1024 (32x32) elements due to on-chip antenna integration and the wafer-scale integration of multiple reticles on a single chip.  

About TowerJazz’s SBC18H3 BiCMOS Process
The phased array chip was developed using TowerJazz’s SBC18H3 BiCMOS which offers both high-performance 0.18-micron SiGe bipolar and high quality passive elements combined with high density 0.18-micron CMOS, to enable high-speed networking and millimeter wave applications. The process offers SiGe transistors with peak Fmax of 280 GHz and peak Ft of 240 GHz, ideal for low-power, high performance millimeter wave circuits, which replace the need for more expensive GaAs chips. SBC18H3 comes standard with 1.8 and 3.3 volt CMOS (dual-gate), deep trench isolation, lateral and vertical PNP transistors, MIM capacitors, high-performance varactors, poly-silicon as well as metal and N-well resistors, p-i-n and Schottky diodes, high-Q inductors,  triple well isolation, and six layers of metal.  TowerJazz also manufactures a faster, lower noise process, named SBC18H4, with Fmax of 340 GHz.
  
The chip was designed and tested by Samet Zihir and Ozan Gurbuz from the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at UCSD under the supervision of Prof. Gabriel M. Rebeiz, with help from Dr. Arjun Karroy, TowerJazz, and was sponsored by the DARPA DAHI program under the direction of Dr. Daniel Green. 

Availability
The SBC18H3 process is available through the TowerJazz multi-project wafer (MPW) systemwww.towerjazz.com. The chip is available from UCSD and interested parties should contact Prof. Gabriel M. Rebeiz; Department of Electrical and Computing Engineering at UCSD, 858/534-8001 orThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

TowerJazz will be exhibiting at IMS 2015 (booth #736) on May 19-21, and Dr. Rebeiz from UCSD will be presenting a paper on May 20, titled, “A 60 GHz 64-element Wafer-Scale Phased-Array with Full-Reticle Design” in Room 125AB from 1:50pm – 2:10pm.

About UCSD
The University of California, San Diego, is one of the leading Universities in mixed-signal, microwave and mm-wave RFICs, digital communications, applied electromagnetics, RF MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) and nano-electronics research, and is home to the Center for Wireless Communications.  UCSD has an annual research budget exceeding $850M, and its Jacobs School of Engineering is ranked as Number 17 in the US-News and World Report 2015 ranking.  The Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, consisting of 46 teaching tenure faculty, trains approximately 400 graduate students per year. For more information, please visit www.ece.ucsd.edu and www.ucsd.edu.  

About TowerJazz
Tower Semiconductor Ltd. (NASDAQ: TSEM, TASE: TSEM) and its fully owned U.S. subsidiary Jazz Semiconductor, Inc. operate collectively under the brand name TowerJazz, the global specialty foundry leader. TowerJazz manufactures integrated circuits, offering a broad range of customizable process technologies including: SiGe, BiCMOS, mixed-signal/CMOS, RF CMOS, CMOS image sensor, integrated power management (BCD and 700V), and MEMS. TowerJazz also provides a world-class design enablement platform for a quick and accurate design cycle as well as Transfer Optimization and development Process Services (TOPS) to IDMs and fabless companies that need to expand capacity.

To provide multi-fab sourcing and extended capacity for its customers, TowerJazz operates two manufacturing facilities in Israel (150mm and 200mm), one in the U.S. (200mm) and three additional facilities in Japan (two 200mm and one 300mm) through TowerJazz Panasonic Semiconductor Co. (TPSCo), established with Panasonic Corporation of which TowerJazz has the majority holding. Through TPSCo, TowerJazz provides leading edge 45nm CMOS, 65nm RF CMOS and 65nm 1.12um pixel technologies, including the most advanced image sensor technologies. For more information, please visit www.towerjazz.com and www.tpsemico.com.

0.18-micron SiGe bipolar

Newsletter

Often interesting

Latest issue

 Gig LTE & Massive MIMO ushering in the Age of Wireless Abundance

Wireless Abundance is here: What the new tech means http://bit.ly/Wirelessabundance
Sprint & T-Mobile Charge to be 1st in U.S. to Gig LTE bit.ly/STMOgig  AT&T bit.ly/ATTGIG2016
Kitahara of Softbank “I am crazy about Massive MIMO” http://bit.ly/MMIMOCrazy
20 Gig mmWave, Massive MIMO & Gig LTE at the Huawei MBBF http://bit.ly/Huawei20
LTE gets to the gigabit explained for non-engineers http://bit.ly/GigLteexplained
Massive MIMO explained. http://bit.ly/WHMassiveMIMO
2017's Big Gigabit story: Qualcomm 835 is ready http://bit.ly/BigGigLTE
Doubling speed with 4x4 MIMO & 256 QAM at T-Mobile http://bit.ly/2k1gEOQ
Netgear Nighthawk M1, Telstra do "gigabit class" LTE http://bit.ly/2k1s5Gq
Spectrum price down by half http://bit.ly/Spectrumhalfoff
Dish and the telcos see big asset cut http://bit.ly/auctionlosers
Shorts on 3GPP,  NYU research, Ralph de la Vega, 5G new radio

Read more ...

5GW News

dave right5G? 4G? Whatever the name, wireless is going to a gigabit, soon.  I've reported broadband since 1999 and now is the time for gigabit wireless. Catch a mistake or have news? Email me please. Dave Burstein

 

Stories worth writing

Starry may match Verizon 5G at half the cost
OFCOM in UK: Share all spectrum, even licensed
OFCOM's Boccardi: 26 GHz worldwide: U.S. goes 28 
Verizon 5G fixed tests will be only 100's of homes
Massive MIMO FD at China Uni, Tele, Huawei, ZTE

 

 

 

Datapoints

Verizon and AT&T burying price increases in fees. 

Huawei's Richard Yu intends to pass both Apple & Samsung in smartphones in five years. 

The 3,000,000,000 transistor Qualcomm 835 is a revolution. Gig LTE, incredible cameras, better VR & AR, & ... State of the art CPU, DSL, GPU, ISP tightly integrated

1,000 T-Mobile small cells 2016, 6,000 more coming. Tech Life

New $84 Reliance Lyf Wind 7S has a 5" screen, a quad-core Snapdragon, an 8 megapixel camera, and some extras. Not state of the art, perhaps, but completely usable at a modest price. 

Orange/FT 4G covers 97% of Poland, 96% of Moldova, but only 84% in France, Q3 2016. They have 113.5 mobile customers in Africa compared to 25.5M in Europe.

more

Read more ...