millimeter wave wireless

  • France Telecom Getting Serious About 5G in High Frequencies

    Belfort Wikipedia
    Gets ARCEP permission to test. Ted Rappaport at NYUhas convinced the industry that high-frequency, millimeter wave wireless can work. But many questions remain. What are the effects of walls, windows, rain, and distance? We have only partial answers.

    France Telecom/Orange intends to find out. They just receive approval for a year's worth of testing in the ancient city of Belfort. Much of the testing to date has been in Manhattan, Brooklyn and other highrise areas. Belfort is ideal for testing low-rise and suburban regions.

  • Future wireless isn't infinite but will be a heck of a lot better

    Infinity Symbol slashedIs 10X enough or will we deploy 50X? 10X today's wireless speeds is likely within a few years; 50X is quite realistic within a decade. {jcomments on} I wrote 5G, Gigabit LTE, Millimeter Wave: What Will be Real, When for DSL Reports, the best consumer-oriented broadband site in the U.S., to clear up some confusion. Editor Karl Bode and commentators are right there's enormous hype at the moment in wireless, especially on 5G millimeter wave. However, there are remarkable improvements coming out of the labs as well, many arriving this year." I haven't been this excited since DSL and cable modems came out around 2000. It's a summary of the Wireless Age of Abundance I'm reporting after attending Huawei's remarkable Tokyo Broadband conference and listening to world-class engineers.

    Everything new seems to claim a "gigabit" but the term means different things in different contexts. Some of it is pure hype.

  • Review: Millimeter Wave Wireless Communications

    High Frequency wireless (millimeter wave) can deliver speeds well into the gigabits. At millimeter wavelengths you can aggregate hundreds oMillimeter wave textboolf MHz of spectrum compared to the 20 MHz typical of today's wireless networks. High frequency antennas are very small, so it's practical to put 50 of them on a chip for massive MIMO.

    Rappaport, Heath and colleagues are world leaders in research in millimeter wave high frequencies and MIMO. Rappaport's NYU Wireless Center has been sending teams out to get empirical data on frequencies like 28 GHz. They are testing in two of the toughest locations for a wireless network: Manhattan and Downtown Brooklyn. Heath at the University of Texas built one of the first MU MIMO testbeds.

    With literally $billions going into 5G wireless research you need the latest information and best sources.

  • Verizon: Full Speed Ahead on $20B 5G mmWave Network

    Draft for comment: more thorough and accurate version to come. Improvements and disagreements welcome.

    Verizon has decided to spend $20-25,000,000,000 on 5G millimeter wave to 30-40,000,000 homes, I believe. This is not a test, trial, or “part of 11 cities” deployment. This will be the largest new network in the western world.

    1/3rd to 1/2 of the U.S. will be covered. In 2019 - if all goes well - they will begin installing between 100,000 and 300,000 small cells. They hope to finish this phase in 2022 or 2023.

    Each cell will have a 4G/5G upgradable radio and will immediately add capacity to LTE, right where it’s most needed. That’s why Verizon didn’t buy any spectrum in the auction; LTE & LAA will provide what’s needed, even with an “unlimited” offering.

  • Verizon's Nicola Palmer: We Don't Need Spectrum So We Skipped the Auction

    Nicola Palmer 200 "We have sufficient spectrum holdings below 1 GHz," says Chief Network Officer Nicola Palmer. "We have strong spectrum holdings in the 700, 850, 1900 megahertz (MHz)/PCS, AWS 1 and 3 spectrum bands. So why didn’t we bid on the 600 MHz spectrum? We simply don’t need it."

    Verizon has 40 MHz of fallow spectrum ready for 4G, enough to move from two bands of 20 MHz to four bands and roughly double capacity. Palmer points out 3G traffic is dwindling rapidly, allowing VZ to refarm 3G spectrum.

5GW News

dave rightStarting July 2017, all new articles are at wirelessone.news. The pols and the marketing folks have made "5G" a meaningless term so the name doesn't fit reporting on advanced wireless. This will stay so old links work. I've reported broadband since 1999 and now is the time for gigabit wireless. Catch a mistake or have news? Email me please. Dave Burstein